Alternate Duplass To Academy

Posted on February 22, 2017, 6:27 am
15 secs

“I really want you to see Moonlight in the Ozarks. Because it’s a bit of a miracle.

“The sad truth is, films like this don’t get made anymore. It is a film about a rural white boy from southern Missouri navigating his burgeoning homosexuality while simultaneously trying to overcome the perils of being raised by his conservative-minded, oxycontin-addicted single mother. It has no movie stars. It is unabashedly honest and unapologetically runs against the tide of what is commonly considered to be commercial cinema.

“It is impossible to get a movie like this made in today’s indie film ecosystem. And yet the film exists. Somehow, it got made. And thank God.

“Because this is my favorite film of the last 10 years.” — Alternative Mark Duplass letter to the Academy, contemplated and expressed in a realm that probably wouldn’t have manifested if Moonlight in the Ozarks had been made.

27 Responses to: Alternate Duplass To Academy

  1. DimitriL

    February 22nd, 2017

    There’s this super popular film, see, and it’s called Brokeback Mountain. It’s about GAY GOWBOYS. You should catch up with it sometime.

    Reply
      • Grampappy Amos

        February 22nd, 2017

        The sheep had to really watch out, right

        Reply
  2. Jeff

    February 22nd, 2017

    While I dislike the Moonlight in the Ozarks schtick, the Duplass letter is fucking ridiculous. Duplass keeps producing marginal to slightly above average indies starring mostly middle to upper middle class white people and is most famous for playing a white bro douche on The League. I like Duplass a lot as a filmmaker, mostly because he is an alternative timeline successful version of me but saying Moonlight deserves the award because it’s the kind of indie that never gets made is disingenuous. Indies about all these themes get made all the time, Barry Jenkins just made the best one. He made the very best case indie. The movie is a playbook on everything that can go right for an indie filmmaker and thus potential investor. It’s an entire path is like an indie filmmakers wet dream, especially someone like Duplass who has almost certainly turned down modestly budgeted studio fare so he can keep final cut and star in roles he would never ever ever be cast in were he not the producer, writer or director.

    Reply
  3. Brad

    February 22nd, 2017

    Masterpiece is such an overused term. I wish that could stop. And I agree that Duplass has made a lot of marginal quirky stuff, so I am not sure that his thoughts count for that much.

    It remains the fact that there is one truly Best Picture this year, as the HR academy voter said today, it is Hell or High Water – and it not going to win – so the Oscars really do not mean that much, and Duplass should not so concerned about empowering the Academy with merit for these trophies that they really do not deserve.

    Reply
    • February 22nd, 2017

      Sort of demonstrates the subjectivity of the whole affair when a clunky, pandering eye-roller like Hell or High Water is touted as the only film that really deserves it, when it’s chief virtue seems to be being a serviceable, well-acted thriller that repeatedly whacks its characters and the audience with a rolled up newspaper.

      Reply
      • Brad

        February 22nd, 2017

        apparently a lot of critics disagree with you, since metacritic has it at 88

        Reply
        • February 22nd, 2017

          That’s the same rating that Rotten Tomatoes has for American Beauty, yet I feel ok moderating my praise for it these days.

          Reply
          • Brad

            February 22nd, 2017

            I do not use RT, too many bloggers in there 😉 – ya know.

            But yes, I always thought AB was pretty overrated.

            Highwater is not perfect, but it ticks a lot of boxes. It is genuine, interesting, has a human story, good dialogue, suffering, expanse, silence and introspection. And it is cut under 2 hours and is very complete motion picture, yet nicely inconclusive. The actors are all pretty terrific, even down to the waitress and other people at the diner. The lensing is gorgeous and the score is spot on. No other this movie year got so many things right. And it is far better than La La Land.

          • February 22nd, 2017

            Good defense. I actually agree with a lot of those observations, my hangup with it has to do more with the large print, somewhat hamfisted attitude. It felt like an exploitation picture preaching to the choir. Like it was by someone who really disdains West Texas and wants to use it and its people as a club to beat up “capitalism” with.

          • Brad

            February 22nd, 2017

            Okay, thanks. I did not feel the despise of Texas in the movie. I cannot find a very great bio on Taylor Sheridan, the writer, but I know he mostly lived in Texas in his youth. I think there is this complexity to Texas characters and people, it is an odd mixture of unwillingness to modernize, nobility a despise of government. I took this slice of Texas suffering as a piece of the greater US pie, outlying areas betrayed by bankers and lawyers, generations of kids movie out of farming and ranching, these territories with a foot in each era, today and yesteryear. But there is a certain nobility in this picture, that the Pine character rescues his children, not simply by giving them money, but by giving them this family land. The last lines on that porch with Pine and Bridges are potent to me.

      • Brad

        February 22nd, 2017

        thanks

        Reply
  4. February 22nd, 2017

    So is it the Florida part or the black part that you are having difficulty with? When Winter’s Bone was up for Best Picture did you think of it as a white movie or an Ozarks movie?

    Reply
    • February 22nd, 2017

      You can try to nail me this way or that way or any way that comes to mind. The bottom line is that Moonlight in the Ozarks would have barely made a dent.

      Reply
      • February 22nd, 2017

        Until it did, and it wouldn’t keep you from saying the same thing about the next Moonlight. As William Goldman said, “nobody knows anything.” I wonder how this column would fare as Nashville Elsewhere. That would be the same basic thing, right?

        Reply
        • February 22nd, 2017

          If I tried writing a column called Nashville Elsewhere, it’s a pretty safe bet that the traffic and ad revenue would be at lower levels than with HE. I feel soiled and humiliated that I’ve even answering you.

          Reply
          • Eric

            February 22nd, 2017

            Nashvegas Elsewhere would be a hit.

      • wacoose

        February 22nd, 2017

        Do you really think a film version of Hillbilly Elegy wouldn’t make any kind of a dent? I think it would.

        Reply
        • Dr. New Jersey

          February 22nd, 2017

          A film version? Was this something on HBO that HE missed?
          (Edit: Someone informed me this was a “book”. The Oscar race doesn’t leave time for such things.)

          Reply
  5. HamOrThyme

    February 22nd, 2017

    Seriously, until you visit, turn it loose with the Ozarks bit. Not only is it a real part of the country, it would do just fine on the screen, either for narrative or socio-political commentary and/or imagery. You read like an ignoramus (not that uncommon lately) every time you get on this jag.

    Reply
  6. Mr. F.

    February 22nd, 2017

    The Pavilions guy was right

    Reply
  7. Ferret Jones

    February 22nd, 2017

    For a lot of people, myself included, this film hit a nerve. I’m saying this while not being either black or gay. It has been a success because it’s a beautiful story that has been made into a great film. Anyone is more than welcome to not be as open to embracing it as others, but your comments strike me as just being grossly cynical for no reason. As if to say this movie is lauded for the mere fact that it revolves around black people. Like this movie was the way to correct the wrong of #oscarssowhite. I really don’t get your point of trying to suggest this movie wouldn’t work if it were set somewhere else involving people of a different race. What a stupid argument to make.

    Reply
  8. Bobby Peru

    February 22nd, 2017

    At some point you should have the balls to realize and admit that you missed it, not everyone else.

    Reply
  9. m_00_m

    February 22nd, 2017

    Putting stuff in other people’s mouths is such fun:

    JEFF WELLS SAYS:

    I only credit things that validate my life and worldview. The movie about repressed, morose white people is a giant insight into human nature, but I can’t relate to what happens during the movie about homosexual black people. And since it’s not possible for other white people to, in fact, relate to what happens in “Moonlight”, the white people who say so must be lying. This is in no way an indication of a crippling lack of empathy on my part – it’s clearly a conspiracy by the politically correct forces of mind control. My brilliant idea of a movie of the travails of poor rural white people will expose this charade once and for all.

    P.S. “Winter’s Bone”? Never heard of it.

    Reply

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